South Carolina Ranked Among States with Highest Rates of Pedestrian Deaths

Accident Lawyers in Columbia, Myrtle Beach, Kingstree and Marion, South Carolina

Pedestrian fatality claims in Columbia SCA report from the Governors Highway Safety Association shows pedestrian deaths in the US increased each year from 2014 through 2016.

According to the GHSA preliminary data:

  • Pedestrian fatalities increased 25 percent from 2010 to 2015
  • Pedestrian fatalities increased 11 percent in 2016 compared to 2015
  • The 2016 increase was the largest annual increase by number and by percentage of pedestrian deaths in the 4 decades that national data has been tracked
  • The second largest increase in pedestrian deaths was in 2015
  • When looking at fatality rate, South Carolina came in third behind Delaware and Florida

According to the report, South Carolina has a pedestrian fatality rate of 2.55 per 100,000 population. It was one of 10 states with a pedestrian fatality rate above 2 per 100,000 people. Large cities, including New York and Los Angeles, had the highest numbers of pedestrian deaths.

There are a number of things that could be contributing to increasing nationwide pedestrian deaths. Two likely factors are:

  • Smartphone use: Both drivers and pedestrians can be dangerously distracted by texting and other cell phone use.
  • Alcohol: Intoxicated drivers as well as pedestrians put themselves in serious danger.

There may also be more people commuting by foot, or motorists may be logging more miles in their vehicles. Even yearly weather patterns could be affecting the rate of pedestrian fatalities.

If you or a loved one has been injured in a pedestrian vs. auto accident in South Carolina, the experienced attorneys at Whetstone Perkins & Fulda can help you determine if you are able to pursue compensation in an injury claim. We are proud to serve areas across the state, including Columbia, Myrtle Beach and Kingstree. For a free case review, please call our law firm at 803-799-9400.

Source: www.ghsa.org/sites/default/files/2017-03/2017ped_FINAL_4.pdf